DIY Chalkboard Sign

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Confession…I love chalkboards. Or, I love creating cute little works of art on chalkboards. Weird, I know. I have created some fun chalkboard signs for my mom’s business and thought it was time I have one in my home. I created a new photo gallery wall in our living room and took down the old gallery wall which was hanging in this space. It’s kind of an awkward spot. You enter our home into a foyer with a vaulted ceiling with the living room, dining room and kitchen to the left but you don’t really see those rooms until you round the corner. As you turn the corner, you step up 4 stairs into the living area and this wall is right in front of you.

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Not only is it an awkward spot, but the wall itself is a bit awkward as well. It is essentially a square in the center of our upstairs area. On the left of it is our living room and on the right is our dining room and kitchen. And because of the light switches and thermostat, the placement of anything you put on the wall either has to be really high or really low. Which is the reason I wanted to move the gallery wall, because the photos were up so high, you never really saw them very well. Once I completed this sign, I loved it in this space but still felt like the wall needed something on the lower half too. I think a thin sofa table up against the wall could possibly look good. However, very shortly there will be a DIY baby gate at the top of those stairs…hint hint at a future post…that will visually cover that space as you walk up toward the wall so I will most likely leave it as is until after the gate is up.

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The great thing about this sign is that the size is completely customizable for your space if you use the same project boards that I used from Lowe’s. They come in multiple sizes, thicknesses and made from different types of wood. For my space, I used a stain grade pine panel that is 3/4″ thick x 24″ tall x 36″ wide. Unfortunately, I can’t find these pine panels on their website anymore but they are usually kept in the lumber area, near the wood trim section.

Supplies
stain grade pine panel 3/4″ x 24″ x 36″
1″ x 2″ x 4′ pine board (for trim)
table saw or miter box (for cutting trim)
wood glue
1 1/2″ brad nails and nail gun
wood filler
220-grit sandpaper
chalkboard paint
stain or chalk paint for trim (I used Minwax stain in Dark Walnut)
chalk

Step 1: Cut your trim

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Lay your project board down and cut a piece of trim for each side. Now, you can just do straight edge cuts on your trim instead of angled miter cuts. If you have a table saw and can do miter cuts easily, then I say go for it. If you are trying to do it with a miter box and hand saw, probably not worth all the effort. At least not with the wood that I used for the trim, because it is not soft and would not be easy to cut through with a hand saw. So, if you are doing a straight edge, 90° cut with a jigsaw, simply cut the top and bottom pieces first, attach them with the wood glue and nails, as shown in step 3, and then measure and cut the side pieces. If you are doing a mitered angle cut, I measured one side at a time and as I measured the next side, I held the previous side in place to make sure I had a proper measurement and snug fit at each corner.

Step 2: Paint

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I know it might seem a little backwards to paint first and then assemble, and you don’t have to do it this way, especially because if you use wood filer to seal the corners on the trim, you’ll have to touch that up anyway. However, I didn’t want to deal with having to be super careful to not get the chalkboard paint on the trim once it was assembled so it just seemed easy and must faster to paint the pieces beforehand. Like I mentioned above, I used this chalkboard paint for the main board (2 coats) and Minwax stain in Dark Walnut for the trim (1 coat wiped on with a cloth).

Step 3: Attach trim to chalkboard

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Lay a piece of trim down on it’s thicker edge, add a thin line of wood glue to the edge that will attach to the chalkboard. Make sure the edges of your trim are flush with the chalkboard or the corner on each end and attach the trim using 1 1/2″ brad nails and a nail gun

Step 4: Finish corners with wood filler

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Use a little wood filler at each corner to fill in any gap between the trim boards. Once it is dry, use 220-grit sandpaper to buff the wood filler smooth and touch up with whichever stain or paint you used.

Step 5: Chalk art fun!

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Now you get to change up your wall décor as often as you want, and the great thing about chalk…if you don’t like it, you can wipe it off and do it again! I get a lot of my chalkboard inspo from Pinterest. Just type in chalkboard art and there you go. Some are way more intricate than others so just start with something simple and each time you can get a little more brave 🙂 I also added this little faux fern garland to the top for a little something extra because I felt like the wall was still a little naked.

Tips for creating chalkboard art
1. Use your chalk to divide you board into 4 equal sections, lightly draw a faint line down the middle of the board both vertically and horizontally. Whatever picture you are using as your inspiration, visualize it in 4 sections just like your board. This will help you with placement of each word or picture in relation to everything else.
2. Start from the center and work your way out. I started this board with “hello” and the sun, and then followed with each line and did the arrows last. It was easy to figure out the placement for the most central word and then look at how each word or object is placed in relation to that central word.
3. Sketch it out first. I do a very rough, very light-handed sketch of each word to make sure I like the placement and the size before coloring it in darker or finalizing it. Keep a wet rag on hand to wipe away sketch marks that don’t blend in or are outside the lines of your final word. This works especially well for cursive words because, for reals….my cursive ain’t pretty! Unless I go VERY slowly and sketch it first.
Have fun!!

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Deck Restoration, Part 2

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When I got to the point of being ready and able to start getting projects done again, with the urging of my husband, I knew I needed to finish up some things I had started before I got pregnant. A few examples…
1. The set of stairs from our foyer into our living room. I changed the stairs over from carpet to hardwood, stained/painted them but still need to add finish trim.
2. The kitchen cabinets. I started painting them white and am only about halfway, which by the way, they have stayed for about 1 1/2 years. Ugh! I realized when I got pregnant that the paint/varnish stripper I was using was very toxic so I had to stop using it. I bought a non-toxic version but of course it just didn’t work as well and took SO much longer.
3. My dining room table, we have a beautiful farm table with no seating 😦
4. And finally, our backyard deck. Since it is the start of summer (which really doesn’t get in full swing until July 4th around here) I thought this would be the best place to start so we could enjoy it once the weather gets consistently warm. It’s been about halfway done for a year…or so I thought. I was telling myself that I started this project last summer and only stopped because the weather changed. Except…I was very very pregnant last summer and didn’t work on the deck at all. So, it’s actually been sitting halfway done for 2 years now! UGH!!! Real life.

Hubby asked over and over if I just wanted to hire someone to finish the deck. I, because I am way too independent and stubborn, continued to say no no no, I will finish it. Time to put my money where my mouth is.

So, for the last 2 weeks, I’ve been working on it here and there, when the weather permits and during naptimes. The progress is slow but I’m determined! And because I’m trying to do this without starting any other projects in the process, I wanted to give you a little update of what I’ve been working on.

One of the first projects I did was the restoration of our front porch deck, you can see that post here. I’m using the same products on the back deck which I will link to throughout this post. The back deck was a bit worse off that the front. On the front porch, I didn’t have to replace any boards, just clean and stain. Here is a little insight into what I’m working with in the back…

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At first glance, it doesn’t look so bad. But…

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 Lots of small areas of rotted wood, and as I began to remove boards, found quite a bit more underneath. Row by row, I removed the boards, starting furthest from the house. Some boards were still fully painted and in tact so I did reuse some of them, however, I would suggest NOT doing this. Even though I used the same board size as what was already in place, the new boards are slightly wider and thicker than the old boards. Not by a huge amount, but just enough to make it noticeable. So, going forward, I’m going to replace all boards.

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I’ve got about half of the boards replaced at this point, right now I’m trying to get all the railings painted before continuing to replace the remaining boards, including all the stairs. I’ve got a big task ahead of me and I’m trying to get it all done by 4th of July!! Oh boy!

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I’m using the same deck stain as the front porch, Behr Deck Over solid stain in padre brown for the floor boards and anchor posts and solid stain in white for the railings. I am adding these solar power post caps to the railings for some night lighting. Keep in mind, these do not give off a ton of light so these are more just for aesthetics than lighting your outdoor space at night.

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I ordered this outdoor furniture from Target.com and LOVE it!! It is a simple black iron frame complete with white cushions. I purchased the loveseat and 2 chairs from the Fernhill patio collection. The black and white pillows are also from Target but are indoor pillows which I coated with Scotchguard to waterproof them for the outdoors. We will see how they hold up 🙂 I couldn’t find these exact pillows online to link them but they do have a TON of new indoor styles to choose from plus a sale on most outdoor accessories.

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So here’s too a few weeks of hard work so we can enjoy this area for the couple of months that we have sun and warm weather 🙂

 

DIY Floating Shelves

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I am so excited to FINALLY share this project with you all! I have been working on it for what feels like forever. Wait…you mean…having a baby will drastically change the amount of time in the day you have to accomplish things?!?! Case in point, I’ve been trying to write this blog post for 3 days now 🙂

When I started placing the furniture in the nursery, I knew I wanted this corner to be the “play” corner or the area for all the toys. Landon already owns quite a few books so a book shelf seemed like the way to go but I also wanted room for some sort of toy box (a post on that to come in the future) so shelves up on the wall were necessary for space. Enter the DIY Floating Shelves from Shanty 2 Chic. If you haven’t checked out their site before and you enjoy DIY building, check them out. If you’ve ever searched for DIY building projects on Pinterest, chances are you’ve come across some of their work. Their projects are always really well explained and the plans are very detailed.

I did make some adjustments to the original plans because the plans called shelves that were 3.5′ in either direction and I only had room for 2′. So, my plans are for 2′ long corner shelves and the materials listed are enough for 3 shelves. If you follow the plans on Shanty 2 Chic, their plans are for 3.5′ shelves and the materials listed are for 1 shelf so make sure you double or triple the amount of wood depending on how many shelves you want.

So, here we go…step by step 🙂

Supplies
NOTE: Before purchasing the wood, see the note in step 6 regarding the 2×4 and 1×6 boards

3 – 2″ x 4″ x 8′
2 – 1/4″ x 24″ x 48″ plywood
2 – 1″ x 10″ x 8′
2 – 1″ x 6″ x 8′
kreg jig for pocket holes
drill
2 1/2″ pocket screws
nail gun
1 1/4″ brad nails
3″ screws (torx or dry wall, whatever you prefer, these will be to screws the support boards to the wall and into a stud)
stud finder
wood glue
paint
hardware (for decorative purposes, I’ll show you what I used when I get to that part below)

Step 1: You will need to determine the height placement of each shelf. You want to think about what you are going to put on the shelves and how much space you need in between each one. I wanted my shelves to take up the majority of the corner and knew I was going to be putting some taller items and books on them so here are the measurements I used…
Floor to ceiling, the room is 96″ tall. Each shelf is approximately 4.5″ tall. Based on that, I measured out equal spacing from ceiling to the top shelf, between each shelf, and from bottom shelf to the floor, which was 20.5″.
Ceiling
20.5″
Shelf #1: 4.5″
20.5″
Shelf #2: 4.5″
20.5″
Shelf #3: 4.5″
20.5″
Floor

You will also want to locate the studs in your wall and mark those as well as you will drill each wall cleat directly into a stud.

Step 2: Build your wall cleats.
Using the 2″ x 4″ x 8′, make the following cuts
3 pieces @ 2′ (long wall cleat)
3 pieces @ 1′ 10 1/2″ (short wall cleat)
12 pieces @ 7 5/8″ (cleat braces)

When constructing each wall cleat, you will use one long wall cleat, one short wall cleat and 4 cleat braces, 2 1/2″ pocket screws and wood glue.
Using a kreg jig, drill for 2 1/2″ pocket screws into one end of each cleat brace then attach the cleat braces to the cleats as shown. I didn’t measure the placement of the cleat braces, just lined up the wall cleats (long wall cleat against the corner, short wall cleat against the long wall cleat) and then marked where the cleat braces should go so that they just met each other at the corner edge. The other two cleat braces went at the opposite ends of the wall cleats.

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Step 3: Attach wall cleats to the wall
Use a drill bit that is slightly smaller than the 3″ screws. Line up a wall cleat where you want it and drill a pilot hold into the wall cleat directly over the stud, check for level. Using the 3″ screws, attach the wall cleat to the wall in at least 2 different points.

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Step 4: Attach bottom panels to braces
You are basically going to wrap the braces in wood to build out your shelf. Using the 1/4″ plywood, make the following cuts (I made the cuts at home but if you don’t have a saw, you can ask some in the lumber department to make the cuts for you)
3 pieces @ 23 1/4″ x 9 1/4″ (long bottom panel)
3 pieces @ 14″ x 9 1/4″ (short bottom panel)
Use a wood glue, a nail gun and 1/4″ brad nails to attach 1 long bottom panel and 1 short bottom panel to each set of braces.

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Step 5: Attach top panel to braces
Using the 1″ x 10″ x 8′ make the following cuts
3 pieces @ 23 1/4″ (long top panel)
3 pieces @ 14″ (short top panel)
Attach 1 long top panel and 1 short top panel to each set of braces using wood glue, 1 1/4″ finish nails and a nail gun.

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Step 6: Attach the side trim
Using the 1″ x 6″ x 8′ make the following cuts
6 pieces @ 4 1/2″ x 9 1/4″ (side front trim)
NOTE: Because 2×4 are used for the wall cleats, it requires the front and side trim to be only 4 1/2″ wide which is not a width you can buy and will have to rip the board down to 4 1/2″. Again, you can have them do it for you in the lumber department. If you have a table saw at home then you can do it yourself. The other option would be to use 2″ x 3″ for the walls cleats instead of 2″ x 4″. By using 2″ x 3″, you will not need to alter the width of the 1″ x 6″ boards.
Attach side front trim pieces using the same method, wood glue, a nail gun and 1 1/4″ finish nails.

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Step 7: Attach front trim pieces
Using the remaining 1″ x 6″ x 8′ boards, make the following cuts
3 pieces @ 14 3/4″ x 4 1/2″
3 pieces @ 14″ x 4 1/2″
Attach using the same method, wood glue, a nail gun and 1 1/4″ finish nails

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Step 8: Finish with paint and decorate!
I used wood filler to fill in nail holes and the seams. Once dried, I went over the wood filler with 180 grit sand paper to smooth it out.

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I used Heirloom Traditions chalk paint in A La Mode to finish the shelves, topped with clear wax, and sanded the edges for a roughed up look.

Finally, I added some hardware to the corners to give the shelves a bit of an industrial look to compliment some of the other pieces in the nursery.

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I used metal corner braces similar to these from Lowes, and furniture tacks to attach them, spray painted all the pieces with black matte finish spray paint and roughed them up with some sand paper before attaching.

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That’s that! Then I decorated 🙂

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DIY Blanket Ladder

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Can we talk about the LIFE-CHANGING discovery I made a couple weeks ago. It was an average night, we had just eaten dinner and were sitting on the couch when the inevitable conversation came up…”Did you get anything for dessert?” my husband asks…
I hadn’t…fail.
Me: “No, but there is still vanilla ice cream in the freezer from Thanksgiving pie”
Husband: “Do we have anything to put on it?”
In case you can’t tell, I’m not good at keeping my fridge/pantry/cupboards stocked with the basics. I’m the type who goes to the store and buys just what I need for that nights dinner.
Me: “There are some leftover chocolate chips in the cupboard…”
Husband: “Can you melt them?”
We have really interesting conversations 🙂
I proceed to melt the leftover chocolate chips, dish up some ice cream and then drizzle the chocolate on top. Basic, right?
Umm…it hardened pretty quickly just like magic shell, but I hadn’t added anything to it! Is this normal?!?! Mic drop! I was so excited!! That’s the easiest dessert ever!
I’m not sure why I was so excited, apparently it doesn’t take much these days. Anyway, I was pretty stoked about this discovery, and please don’t burst my bubble if I’m like 10 years late to the party and you all knew this fact long ago.

You may recognize this blanket ladder from a couple years ago if you’ve been following me from the start…wow, that’s crazy, that I’ve been at this blogging thing for a couple years now! Since my time is a bit preoccupied these days and I haven’t had time to complete any new projects recently, I thought I’d repost one of my faves and one of the easiest, who knows, maybe you know someone that this would make a great holiday gift for. Or maybe you just want one for yourself. Either way, this whole project took me less than hour from constructing to stained.

Supplies
2 2×4 @ 8ft
1 2×6 @ 8ft
2″ wood screws
skill saw
kreg jig
drill

1. Use your skill saw to make the following cuts
2 2×4 cut to 5ft each
4 2×6 cut to 17in each

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2. Use your kreg jig to drill 4 pocket holes (2 on each end) into the 4 2×6 pieces for 2″ wood screws

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3. Lay one of the 2x4s on flat, level ground. The left side of the 2×4 will be the front of your ladder. Measure and mark every 12″ along the front of the ladder where your rungs will sit. Take one of the 2x6s and set it on the 2×4, turned slightly diagonal, so that the bottom of the 2×6 is even with the front of your ladder and the top of the 2×6 is even with the back of the ladder. Attach with 2″ wood screws.

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4. Continue with the other 3 2x6s at each of the 12″ marks.

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5. Once you’ve attached all 2x6s, measure and mark every 12″ on the other 2×4, lay it on flat, level ground and turn the ladder over onto the 2×4 so that the rungs meet up with the opposite side and attach with 2″ wood screws.

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Easy peasy! Now paint or stain to your desired color, let dry and add blankets!

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DIY Spa Bathtub Tray

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I’ve been wanting to do this project for a while. Especially because I’ve been spending so much more time in the bathtub these last few months. I wanted the spa-like relaxation but, truth be told, I also wanted a place to set my laptop so I could get some blog work done while I’m unwinding. And, after baby comes, it’ll be a handy place to set my wine glass too…can’t wait for wine again!

This project was SO quick and easy. I think it took maybe an hour total. It should be pretty easy to customize it to your own bathtub since the measurements are so minimal.

Supplies
Pine Project Board
(To find the size that best fits your bathtub, you’ll need to measure across the top of your tub and keep in mind you’ll need a few extra inches in length for it to hang over to attach some “feet” to help hold it in place. As far as the width, that can just be your preference. I used a 1″ thick x 12″ wide x 48″ long board, linked above. I wanted plenty of width for my laptop as well as all the pretty bath supplies I was about to buy)
1×2 pine board
(This is for the feet, the length you need will depend on how wide you main plank board is. Example, my board was 12″ wide so I needed 24″ of 1″x2″ board to trim out the sides of my tray)
handles
(You don’t have to add handles to your tray but it’s a nice decorative touch. You can get simple drawer pulls at any hardware store or if you want something with a little more style, World Market, Hobby Lobby and Anthropologie are great places to look. I got mine at Anthropologie and linked them above)
jigsaw
wood glue
1 1/4″ finish nails
measuring tape
pencil
drill and drill bits (if you are adding handles)
paint color of your choice

Step 1: Measure the exact width of your plank board and cut 2 pieces of the 1×2 pine board to that length

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Step 2: Lay your pine board across the top of your bathtub, place one of the cut 1×2 pieces up against one side of the tub, flush with the edge of the pine board. Hold the pine board in place, hold a piece of 1×2 against the side of the tub (on the opposite side) then use a pencil the mark a cut line on the pine board. Cut the pine board along the cut line.
Step 3: Attach the 1×2 “feet” to the pine board, flush with the edges using wood glue and 1 1/4″ finish nails on the underside.

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Step 4: Drill holes for handles. Choose a drill bit that is just slightly larger than the screws on your handles. Choose the location for your handles, I placed mine so they would sit just inside the edge of the tub.

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Step 5: Paint in color of your choice and distress. I used Heirloom Traditions chalk paint in A La Mode then sanded the edges slightly with 150 grit sandpaper.
Step 6: place across your tub and add all your favorite bath supplies

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I’ve always loved Anthropologie but lately I’ve been extra obsessed with all their home décor, especially their candles and giftable items. I knew they had a cute little bath & body care area so I decided to look there to stock up on supplies for this project. The brands are a little spendier than say Target, however the packaging, quality and scents are incredible and well worth the money for this type of thing…in my opinion. Here are links to all the products I purchase…

Barr-Co Original Scent Bath Salts
Barr-Co Bubble Elixir
Mediterranean Sea Silk Sponge
Baudelaire Cedar Bath Brush
Voluspa Glass Maison Candle in Bourbon Vanille

Hope you enjoy your swanky spa space as much as I’m enjoying mine!

DIY Vintage Scoreboard

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Nesting has officially set in…I’m feeling to pressure of the timeline and that this little munchkin is only 14 weeks away. Man…when I write it down like that, it seems even closer! I really haven’t done much in the nursery yet other than getting the crib, a light fixture (which is currently sitting on the floor) and some wood blinds (also not installed, still in the box). Next big focuses are the closet and changing table before I really start to decorate. I have been trying to wait until after all the baby showers. Yes, I said “all the baby showers”. This is one lucky little baby, there are 3 showers lined up over the next 4 weeks to help celebrate him. I’ve been holding myself back from buying too much until after the showers but it’s getting so hard. I just want to start buying stuff off my own registry and feel settled in the room and ready!!

As you might be able to tell from this project, we are going with a vintage sports theme in the nursery. I have never been big on themes so it will be subtle with just a few sports touches, we’ll see how it evolves throughout the decorating process. One thing I did know, I wanted a vintage looking scoreboard hanging somewhere in the room after seeing some online. This is what I came  up with. I didn’t map out the measurements beforehand and it wasn’t big enough for what I initially had planned (a baseball scoreboard that had 5 lines of writing and numbers) but I quickly decided that wasn’t going to fit. The design changed a bit as I started painting the words, especially after writing the first line so big…Landon Stadium…anyone catch on there? 🙂

I’m thinking this will hang above the crib and I’m so excited to see how it looks with the crib bedding I picked out!!

Supplies
1″ x 24″ x 48″ stain grade pine panel
3 1″ x 2″ x 4′ pine board
furniture nails (color or finish of your choice)
3 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ wood rectangles
paint colors of your choice (see below to find my choices)
paint brushes, one medium for overall color, one small for lettering
120 grit sand paper
wood glue
1 1/4″ finish nails
measuring tape
pencil
jigsaw

Step 1:
I started with this pine panel and 3 of the 4 foot pine boards for the trim

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Step 2:
Paint the pine panel with your base color. I used Heirloom Traditions Chalk Paint in Naval. You don’t need to get the edges perfectly as these will be covered by the trim board in step 3. After painting the pine panel, I painted the inside edge of the trim boards with my paint trim color, Heirloom Traditions Chalk Paint in A La Mode, before attaching the trim boards to I didn’t have to worry about painting the edge next to the blue once it was already attached.

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Step 3:
Measure one long edge of the pine panel from end to end and cut 1 trim board to that length. Attach the trim board using wood glue and 1 1/4″ finish nails making sure the edges are flush. Do the same on the opposite long edge. Now measure the distance exactly between the 2 trim boards on the shorter edge and cut the trim board to fit snug between them. Do the same on the opposite short edge. All edges should be flush and smooth. Once attached, you can finish painting the front and outside edges of the trim.

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Step 4:
Paint the wood rectangles with the paint of your choice. I used Valspar Chalkboard Paint to create a vintage chalkboard look. Once dried, I used 120 grit sandpaper to sand and rough up the edges and front of each square.

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Step 5:
Distress the scoreboard and hand paint letters and numbers! I wanted the base of the scoreboard to look a bit weathered. On the main panel, over the blue I used Heirloom Traditions Patina with a dry brush. Using a tiny bit of patina in the lid of the paint jar, a paint brush and a dry cloth, lightly tap the paint brush in the patina, then dab the brush on the dry cloth before lightly brushing it on the wood surface. Using another dry cloth, blend the patina by rubbing the cloth over the wood surface.
On the white trim edges, I used Heirloom Traditions Soft Wax in Muddy Pond to create a worn look. After applying the wax with a dry brush, I used 120 grit sandpaper to sand the surface and edges.
Finally, I hand painted the lettering on the scoreboard and the numbers on the wood squares using A La Mode and 1/2″ flat paint brush. I decided how many rows of lettering I wanted, measured the whole panel and used a pencil to draw lines for each row. I penciled in the letters for a visual before I started so I had an idea of spacing but other than that just kind of winged it. I wanted it to look raw and natural so don’t worry too much about the letters looking perfect. If you need to, you can always use a stencil.

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Step 6:
Attach the wood squares using the furniture nails. There are many different colors and finishes available in these at Lowe’s. I chose the Nickle finish. I also used the Muddy Pond soft wax over all the lettering and numbering, then went over each with the sandpaper one more time to give the letters and numbers a faded look.

Also, sidenote…my crib is from Wayfair.com. And I am OBSESSED! I couldn’t find exactly what I wanted in White…of course…so I bought this Viv + Rae Rocco Kokopelli Convertible Crib, painted it white and distressed it. I love the shutter look on the end panels!! And it was on CRAZY sale for only $177!

Can’t wait to get the part of the nursery all put together!! I’ll share photos as they come 🙂 Happy Friday everyone!

DIY T.V. Stand

I’m back!!! It has been SO long since I’ve posted! I’m so happy to be back and have all sorts of great content planned for the next few weeks.

Since I’ve been gone, hubby and I went to Hawaii on a little getaway. The trip was absolutely INCREDIBLE and we fell in love with the island of Kauai, so much so, that we didn’t want to come home.

Is it possible that vacation withdrawals are a real thing? Because I’m pretty sure I had them…severely…once we got back, I just could not get motivated to get back into my normal day-to-day routine.

I am beginning to get back on track. Starting with my latest project! A DIY industrial pipe T.V. stand for our guest bedroom.

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I decided on this style of shelf for a few reasons…
1) Our guest room is not huge, more so because of the huge bed I put in there, so I wanted a piece of furniture that was pretty narrow
2) There are a lot of weird angles in this room as well so there were not a lot of spots to place a t.v. stand in conjunction with the bed placement
3) Due to the size and weird angles, there is not a lot of room for furniture other than a nightstand and this t.v. stand so I also wanted it to be able to hold some décor to dress up the room.

So, this is what I came up with! This is also the first time that I really made a piece of furniture from scratch, with no building plan or instructions. There was certainly some trial and error involved, as well as multiple trips to Lowes.

A couple of notes on this furniture piece. For the cast iron pipe, I used all 3/4″ diameter pipe, this pipe is also available in 1/2″ and 1″ diameter, if you want the frame slimmer or bulkier. The overall measurements are 82″H x 55″W x 18″D.

Supplies
6 floor flange fittings

 4 4″ black pipe
6 closed nipple fitting
20 tee fitting
8 12″ black pipe
2 48″ black pipe
8 18″ black pipe
2 30″ black pipe
2 24″ black pipe
2 black iron cap
4 2″ black pipe
2 90 degree elbow fitting
4 1″x 12″x 8′ whitewood boards cut to 55″ long
1 can matte black spray paint
stain of your color choice to stain boards

Step 1: Build the base. Use 4 floor flange fittings as the feet and space them about 50″ apart across the width and about 1 foot apart through the depth. To the 2 front feet, you are going to add a 4″ black pipe on each side. To the 2 back feet, you are going to add a closed nipple fitting to each side, followed by a tee fitting on each side (with tee edge pointing toward the opposite back foot), and then 2 more nipple fittings on top of each tee.

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Step 2: Add crossbar. Take 1 48″ pipe and attach to the two back feet by screwing one end into one of the tee fittings you just attached. The trick to getting the crossbars attached is to screw them all the way into 1 side, then join the other end into to opposite side tee fitting. You slightly unscrew the first side in order to attach to the opposite side. Each end will be halfway screwed into each tee fitting but should still feel secure. If it doesn’t feel secure, try screwing and unscrewing again. It took me a couple tries but if it’s done right, you should reach a point where the cross bar fits well into each tee fitting.

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Step 3: Add shelf bracket. Using 4 tee fittings, attach to each foot with tee edge facing back to front or front to back. Then using the same method used to attach 48″ crossbar, do the same with 2 12″ pipes to create a spot on each end for the boards to sit, forming the shelves. (See same picture above for reference)

Step 4: Construct second level shelf. Attach 4 18″ pipes to each corner creating the level between shelf 1 and 2. Repeat step 3 to create the bracket for shelf 2.

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Step 5: Construct third level shelf. Repeat step 4 to create the bracket for shelf 3.

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Step 6: Construct fourth level shelf (taller space for t.v. to sit). Use 2 30″ pipe and attach to 2 front legs. Use 2 24″ pipe and attach to 2 back legs. On back legs, repeat step 2 to attach another crossbar for stability. Attach 2 tee fittings to back legs, tee edges facing each other. Add 2 4″ pipe on top of tee fittings to back legs. Use 1 48″ pipe, attach to the tee fittings as the crossbar.

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Step 7: Add top shelf bracket. Repeat step 3 to add fourth and final shelf.

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Step 8: Add top finishing touches! Use 2 closed nipple fittings, add to front legs. Finish front two legs with 2 cap fittings. On back to legs, add 2 2″ pipes, followed by 2 90 degree elbow fittings (elbow edge pointed toward back side of unit), followed by 2 more 2″ pipes and finished with 2 floor flanges. The floor flange will sit flush against the wall and you will attach the unit to the wall with screws for more stability.

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Step 9: Stain or paint your shelves, attach the frame to a wall and place shelves on brackets. Now decorate!! Note: I did not attach the shelves to the pipe in anyway. To be honest, I’m not sure what the best way to do this would be. For now, I don’t have little ones that I need to worry about pulling on the boards, but if I decide to figure out how to attach the shelves I will certainly update you.

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DIY Planter Centerpiece

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My first cold of the season…and I am not a happy camper. I hate being sick because it makes me feel so unproductive but I guess it is good for me to just slow down and rest for a while. I took it easy today and threw together this cute little faux planter centerpiece for my dining room farm table.

I got this idea from my mama who makes these little boxes for all her shows, she does them in all different colors, with different knobs and drawer pulls on the end and then puts mason jars with flowers inside. I got these little faux plants from Ikea a couple weeks ago and knew exactly what I wanted to do with them.

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Supplies
1×6 boards (I used leftover cedar fence pickets from another DIY, these have a rough finish but if you want a smooth finish, you can use pine boards)
1 1/2″ finish nails
paint in the color of your choice
knobs or drawer pulls of your choice (if you have a Hobby Lobby near you, they have a GREAT selection)
4″ faux plants (IKEA has a few different options)

1. I didn’t actually measure the length of the planter box. I laid one board on the ground and set the plants on top of it, in a line, and just eyeballed the spot I wanted to cut. I used the first board as a template for the 2 side boards, and attached them to the bottom with nails.

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2. Measure the distance from one edge to the other on one end of the box to determine the cut length for the end boards and attach with nails.

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3. Drill holes in the end of the box for your knobs or drawer pulls, 1 to 2, depending on what you knobs need. Paint your box before you attach your knobs.

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4. As usual, I used Heirloom Traditions chalk paint in “A la Mode” and then added Heirloom Traditions soft wax in “Muddy Pond” to make the wood a bit more rustic looking. Add you plants and you are all set! You can fill in the space in the box between the plants, if you’d like, with moss or rocks.

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DIY Upcycled Frame

IMG_4730As I type this, I am watching Fixer Upper re-runs and the episode where Joanna created a wall sign with the saying “today is a good day for a good day” is on! It’s meant to be that I have this sign in my home and post it for you all.

I’ve had this frame in my garage for SO long! I got it about a year and a half ago and originally was going to turn it into a mirror, but kept putting off take it to a glass shop because of how huge and heavy it is. Then I saw a faux deer head in a frame backed by weathered wood at a vintage market and I got inspired. I thought about putting a faux deer head in the frame but my hubby nixed that idea…he’s not big on “dead animal décor”, even if it is pretty and fake. So much for that trend.

Supplies
5/8″ x 5 1/2″ x 5″ cedar flat-top boards
1″ panel nails
wood glue
paint of your choice

You could do this with any frame you have, big or small, with some paint and rough cedar.

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I started by taking the backing and picture out of the frame.

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I bought cedar flat-top fence pickets because they are cheap and have a rough grain for a good distressed look. I cut each board to fit just inside the frame and attached them with wood glue and 1″ panel nails.

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Once the boards were in place it was time to make the wood look weathered and to paint the frame…

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On the wood, I used Heirloom Traditions DIY chalk paint in Weathered Wood. I used a wet brush technique (dipped the paint brush into water, then into the paint) so that the paint went on very thin. Once the first coat was dry, I went over it with Dark Liquid Patina, which is a top coat/wax that adds a dark distress and brings out darkened highlights and accents in your wood. On the frame, I used A La Mode chalk paint and lightly brushed over the frame, avoiding pressing too hard to keep the paint from getting into the crevices. The frame and wood turned out EXACTLY how I wanted!! Final step was the print, I used A La Mode chalk paint and a small 1/2″ wide detail brush. I used a pencil to rough sketch the words and then went over it with paint a couple times. You could also use a stencil if that’s easier.

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DIY Cornhole

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I got to spend the day, Saturday, watching one of my good friends say “I do” to her best friend in the most beautiful backyard, DIY, setting. The look and feel of the ceremony and reception couldn’t have been more perfect for Jessie & Kyle.

This was also the wedding I was making the DIY yard games for, such a cute and personal touch that Jessie wanted to add to her big day. I think, of all 3 games I made, Cornhole was my favorite, probably because I created a personalized monogram and painted it onto the cornhole boards so it would feel just a bit more special.

Supplies
4 – 2x4x8 studs
4 – 1x6x8 boards
2″ hinges
wood glue
2 1/2″ nails
2″ finish nails
jigsaw
pencil
straight edge
measuring tape
stain or paint color of your choice
polyurethane top coat
8 bean bags

1. First, you will cut the studs to make the frame
cuts – use your 2x4x8 and make the following cuts
-4 pieces cut to 43″
-4 pieces cut to 15″
Set the rest of your 2x4x8 aside for later use

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(This photo just shows the cut pieces for one cornhole board. Keep in mind, you will have double this amount.)

2. Use wood glue and 2 1/2″ nails to attach the boards together to form the frame, 43″ boards will sit vertically and the 15″ boards will sit horizontally inside the 43″ boards.

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3. Now for the top boards, you will simply cut your 1x6x8 boards in half at 4′.

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4. Next, I laid the 1×6 boards side by side to make sure there were no major bows in the wood and that they laid flat, rearrange the order of the boards if necessary. Once you determine the order the boards will lay, you are going to draw the hole on the 2 center boards. The center of the hole should be 9″ from the top of the board and the hole should be 6″ in diameter. I used the lid of a 1 gallon paint can to draw the circle for cuts.

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5. Use your jig saw to make the cutout for the hole

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6. Now, make a couple of marks to determine the placement of your center 1×6 boards. Find the center of the frame by making a mark at 9″, this is where your center 1×6 boards will meet. On your 1×6 boards, measure and mark 2 1/2″ from the top and bottom. This is where the 1×6 boards will meet the edge of the frame. Use wood glue and 2″ finish nails to attach the 1×6 boards to the frame making sure to line up the edges of the hole, NOT the top and bottom edges of the boards. If the boards aren’t completely even at the top and bottom, don’t worry, you can use the jig saw once all 4 boards are attached to even out the top and bottom cuts.

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7. Use wood glue and 2″ finish nails to attach the outside boards to complete to top of the cornhole boards. Once all 4 boards are attached, use your jigsaw to even out your top and bottom edges if necessary.

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8. Now you are going to flip your board over and attach the retractable legs. Use your remaining 2x4x8 to cut the legs, cut 4 pieces at 11″ each. On the underside of your board, place the legs about 1/2″ from the side edge of the frame and flush with the top edge. Attach the legs with the 2″ hinges so that when you are storing the game boards, you can fold the legs down and under the frame.

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9. Last step is to paint and seal! I used Minwax stain in Walnut and sealed with Minwax Polyurethane top coat. Before sealing, I also added a custom monogram with the couples initials. If you want to do this, you can use a stencil, I did the monogram freehand and it’s much easier than you would think. I used a piece of string measured to the width of the boards, minus 1″. I held one end of the string in the center of the boards and attached the other end to a pencil and drew a complete circle to contain the monogram. Then using pencil, I sketched the outline of the letters. I used Heirloom Traditions chalk paint in “a la mode” to paint the monogram. Once it was dry, I went over the monogram with some fine grit sandpaper to rough it up a bit. This also helps with the edges of the lettering, it doesn’t need to be perfecting straight if you are going to sand it for a rough look.

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I’ll be honest, I didn’t make the bean bags because of time constraints. You can find bean bags at most sporting good stores or if you want cute colors or patterns, try searching on Etsy for custom made bean bags. Maybe one day I’ll give that a DIY shot too!